Fighting for Equality: 1950–2018

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30.00 ساعة تعليمية
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الإنجليزية
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As we see American women coming into positions of economic and political influence, we start to wonder: why now? The Women Have Always Worked MOOC, offered in four parts, explores the history of women in America and introduces students to historians’ work to uncover the place of women and gender in America’s past.

The final segment of the Women Have Always Worked series begins with an examination of how the Cold War reinforced the ideals of the suburban, nuclear family and how these ideals impacted women's trajectory towards independence and equality. We will explore the growing discrepancy and conflict between the breadwinner-homemaker system of beliefs and efforts for peace, economic fairness, and gender equality. We will discover how the feminist movement grew and evolved from the 1960s to today.

This exploration into the evolution of the feminist movement continues with a new section thatexamines the current climate in America. We will take a look at the 2016 presidential campaign and how women across the globe reacted to the results of that election; the rise of the Me Too movement and other grass roots activism led by women and aimed at social and economic inequality; and how the 2018 midterm election ushered in a new era of women in politics.

Together we will learn how women began to ask for equality and what the word equality meant and still means for different women. But we'll also ask you to consider a more difficult set of questions that revolve around whether equality for some women might limit the freedom of others. Will women demand benefits for themselves that provide a few with equality with men while fomenting inequality with each other? What about sisterhood? Will some of us move forward while others are left behind? These are questions that haunt us today.

المدربين

Alice Kessler-Harris
Alice Kessler-Harris
Alice Kessler-Harris is R. Gordon Hoxie Professor of American History Emerita at Columbia University where she was also Professor in the Institute for Research on Women and Gender. Professor Kessler-Harris specializes in the history of American labor and 20th-century social policy. Her books include In Pursuit of Equity: Women, Men and the Quest for Economic Citizenship in Twentieth Century America (2001), which won the Bancroft, Taft, Joan Kelly, and Herbert Hoover prizes; Gendering Labor History (2007), which contains her essays on women, work and social policy, the recently re-issued A Woman’s Wage: Historical Meanings and Social Consequences (1990), and A Difficult Woman: The Challenging Life and Times of Lillian Hellman (2012). She is perhaps best known for the classic Out to Work: A History of Wage-Earning Women in the United States (1982, 2001). This course is based in part on the second edition of Kessler-Harris’ 1981 book, Women Have Always Worked: A Concise History, published in 2018. Professor Kessler-Harris is past president of the Organization of American Historians, the Labor and Working Class History Association, and the American Studies Association. Currently, she serves as Vice President of the Society of American Historians. She is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society.
Nick Juravich
Nick Juravich
Nick Juravich earned his Ph.D. in History from Columbia University in 2017 and currently serves as the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in Women's History at New-York Historical Society. Beginning in September 2019, he will be an assistant professor of public and labor history at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Nick's first book, The Work of Education: Community-Based Educators in Schools, Communities, and the Labor Movement is under advance contract with University of Illinois Press in the Working Class in American History series. Nick is a trained oral history researcher and first interviewed Professor Kessler-Harris for the Institute for Research on Women, Gender and Sexuality at Columbia's 25th Anniversary Oral History Project.
Columbia University Center for Teaching and Learning
Columbia University Center for Teaching and Learning
The Columbia University Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) builds learning experiences on campus and online to support excellence and innovation across educational programs at Columbia University. Working in close partnership with the Columbia teaching community, CTL is committed to advancing the culture of teaching and learning for professional development, curricular enhancement, and academic excellence. Through its programs, services, and resources, we support the purposeful use of new media and emerging technologies in the classroom and online to foster the success of Columbia’s instructors and students.
New-York Historical Society
New-York Historical Society
The New-York Historical Society, one of America’s pre-eminent cultural institutions, is dedicated to fostering research, presenting history and art exhibitions, and public programs that reveal the dynamism of history and its influence on the world of today. Founded in 1804, New-York Historical is the oldest museum in New York City. New-York Historical has a mission to explore the richly layered political, cultural and social history of New York City and State and the nation, and to serve as a national forum for the discussion of issues surrounding the making and meaning of history. Women Have Always Worked course materials produced by the New-York Historical Society were created in cooperation with Intelligent Television.
Intelligent Television
Intelligent Television
Intelligent Television produces innovative films, television, and online video; conducts research in the future of media; and provides strategic planning and consulting services, all in close association with leading cultural and educational institutions and renowned directors and cinematographers — and all to make educational and cultural material more widely accessible worldwide.