The Engineering of Structures Around Us

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شعار المنصة
متاح الآن إلى 2025-02-01
22.50 ساعة تعليمية
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اللغة :
الإنجليزية
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In this introductory course, you’ll learn some engineering principles that can be applied to structural systems everywhere: in nature, in furniture, in mechanical and aerospace systems, and in any solid object that resists a load.

Together we’ll explore how structures work, why they were designed the way they were designed, how they support loads, and where forces flow through them.

More specifically we’ll:

  • Learn about funicular forms and how ropes and cables resist tension.
  • Discuss how columns, arches, and anti-funicular forms resist compression.
  • Discover how trusses, beams and walls resist loads. • Sketch the flow of forces through structures.
  • Compare and contrast different structural forms and systems to answer a range of questions such as: Why might an engineer choose a beam over a truss? How do the dimensions of a structure affect its response? How do engineers choose forms and systems to create structures that are both elegant and functional?

Join us in exploring the engineering of structures around us.

The main course image, Kurilpa Bridge credited to: Alastair Smith, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

المدربين

Vicki May
Vicki May
Vicki May has been teaching engineering since 1997 and has been at Dartmouth since 2005 where she is currently an Instructional Associate Professor at the Thayer School of Engineering. Helping people of all ages understand basic engineering concepts and appreciate the engineering around them are important goals to Vicki. She loves to build things, often with the help of her children, and incorporates hands-on learning in her courses whenever possible. Vicki received a BS in civil engineering from the University of Minnesota in 1991 and an MS and PhD in civil/structural engineering from Stanford University in 1992 and 1996, respectively. She has won several teaching awards over the years including Professor of the Year for Dartmouth and New Hampshire.