Quantum Mechanics for Scientists and Engineers 2

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شعار المنصة
متاح الآن إلى 2025-08-31
76.50 ساعة تعليمية
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الإنجليزية
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نبذة عن المقرر

This course covers key topics in the use of quantum mechanics in many modern applications in science and technology, introduces core advanced concepts such as spin, identical particles, the quantum mechanics of light, the basics of quantum information, and the interpretation of quantum mechanics, and covers the major ways in which quantum mechanics is written and used in modern practice. It follows on directly from the "Quantum Mechanics for Scientists and Engineers 1" course, and is also accessible to others who have studied some quantum mechanics at the equivalent of a first junior or senior college-level physics quantum mechanics course. All of the material for the earlier course is also provided as a resource. The course should prepare the student well to understand quantum mechanics as it is used in a wide range of current applications and areas and provide a solid grounding for deeper studies of specific more advanced topics.

المدربين

David Miller
David Miller

David Miller is the W. M. Keck Foundation Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by Courtesy, Professor of Applied Physics, both at Stanford University. He received his B. Sc. and Ph. D. degrees in Physics in Scotland, UK from St. Andrews University and Heriot-Watt University, respectively. Before moving to Stanford in 1996, he worked at AT&T Bell Laboratories for 15 years.

His research interests have included physics and applications of quantum nanostructures, including invention of optical modulator devices now widely used in optical fiber communications, and fundamentals and applications of optics and nanophotonics. He has published more than 270 technical papers, holds over 70 US Patents, and has an "h-index" of over 100. He has received several awards and honorary degrees for his work, is a Fellow of many major professional societies in science and engineering, including IEEE, APS, OSA, the Royal Society of London, and the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and is a member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in the US.

He has taught quantum mechanics at Stanford for more than 15 years to a broad range of students ranging from physics and engineering undergraduates to graduate engineers and scientists in many disciplines.