(Re)Imagining Port Cities: Understanding Space, Society and Culture

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شعار المنصة
متاح الآن إلى 2024-06-30
27.00 ساعة تعليمية
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الإنجليزية
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Port cities are dynamic environments. They face ever-changing challenges and demands from port activities under continually evolving economic and environmental circumstances. They also offer a rich social and cultural environment.

If you are a professional involved in the development and running of port cities this course will offer you a fresh perspective on the complex spatial and socio-cultural relations between ports, cities and regions and between water and land, around the world. This course will provide you with the insights and tools to understand and transform port city regions. By employing a comprehensive cross-cultural perspective you will make better decisions when addressing the challenges port cities face today and when planning for a sustainable and socially just future of your port city in line with the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

If you are a master level student with an interest in a multidisciplinary approach to the development of cities, with a connection to the built and natural environment this course will offer you an insight into the workings of port city development, preparing you better for a possible career in this area.

If you live in a port city this course will help you understand the development of your city, appreciate the hidden potential and help you influence the way your port city deals with issues such as climate change and rising water levels in the future.

المدربين

Carola Hein
Carola Hein

Carola Hein is Full Professor and Chair, History of Architecture and Urban Planning at Delft University of Technology. Her research interests include the transmission of architectural and urban ideas, focusing specifically on port cities and the global architecture of oil. She leads the PortCityFutures research program that focuses on evolving socio-spatial conditions, use and design of port city regions, in particular exploring areas where port and city activities occur simultaneously and sometimes conflict. Among other major grants, she received a Guggenheim and an Alexander von Humboldt fellowship. She serves as Vice President of the International Planning History Society (IPHS), Editor of PORTUSplus the journal of RETE, co-editor of Creative Practices in Cities and Landscapes (CPCL), IPHS Editor for Planning Perspectives and as Asia book review editor for Journal of Urban History.

Her books include: Adaptive Strategies for Water Heritage: Past, Present and Future, The Routledge Planning History Handbook (2017), Uzō Nishiyama, Reflections on Urban, Regional and National Space (2017), Port Cities: Dynamic Landscapes and Global Networks (2011), The Capital of Europe. Architecture and Urban Planning for the European Union (2004), Rebuilding Urban Japan after 1945 (2003), and Cities, Autonomy and Decentralisation in Japan. (2006), Hauptstadt Berlin 1957-58 (1991). She has also published numerous articles in peer-reviewed journals, books, and magazines.

Stephan Hauser
Stephan Hauser

Stephan Hauser is a PhD candidate at the TU Delft Faculty of Architecture in the Chair of History of Architecture and Urban Planning. His research focuses on the impact of oil companies on the de-velopment of port cities and on the creation and application of regulations linked to spatial plan-ning, and the protection of health and the environment. The case studies are mainly in Nortwhest Europe, like Dunkirk and Rotterdam, to assess the influence of European regulations and develop-ments.

Coming from a legal background and passing through some medical studies, he merged in his pub-lications and his research many disciplines such as history, urban planning, environment, laws and health. This fascination for multi-disciplinary approaches also derived from an internship in the European Council of Town Planners, which led him to pursue a PhD on the complex relation be-tween oil flows, and the European legal frameworks that emerged in response to and in prepara-tion for oil-related spaces and environments.

Rachel Lee
Rachel Lee

Rachel was born in the port city of Dundee, Scotland. She studied architecture in Glasgow and Berlin. She completed her PhD at the Habitat Unit of the TU Berlin and worked at the LMU Munich before joining TU Delft. She has worked on several research and teaching projects in South Asia and East Africa in the port cities of Mumbai and Dar es Salaam.

Paolo De Martino
Paolo De Martino

Paolo De Martino graduated in Architecture with top marks in July 2008 at the Department of Architecture of University of Naples Federico II (DiARC). After graduation he has collaborated with an architectural firm in Naples, focusing mainly on reuse of existing architectural heritage and urban regeneration. Since January 2015 he lives in Delft. He is currently a PhD candidate in Architecture within a dual PhD program between Delft University of Technology and the University of Naples Federico II.

He is investigating port cities from a spatial and institutional perspective, comparing the Italian port-system in the Campania Region with port clusters in the Hamburg-Le Havre range, with particular reference to the cities of Rotterdam, Antwerp and Le Havre. Some of his research – which touches upon the complex relationship between ports, cities and regions – have been discussed in conferences and published in international journals.

In 2017 and 2018 he was involved with teaching, tutoring mastering students in Delft during the Design Studio “Architecture and Urbanism beyond oil” run by Prof. Carola Hein.

Hilde Sennema
Hilde Sennema

Hilde Sennema, MA studied the History of Art and Architecture at the University of Groningen. She specialized in post-war urban planning and governance. After working in the heritage sector, she started her PhD research at the Erasmus University with Paul van de Laar. Her topic is the public-private governance network that modernized and rebuilt the port city of Rotterdam between 1930 and 1970. Her dissertation is co-supervised by Carola Hein (TU Delft) and business historian Ben Wubs (EUR).

She is particularly interested in communicating scientific research to the general public. In the PortCityFutures project, she is the editor of the blog and outside of the academy, she writes a weekly column in the Dutch financial daily paper Het Financieele Dagblad. Hilde loves to swim and works on a blog series about the use of water as a public space with fellow. PCF team members

Asma Mehan
Asma Mehan

Dr. Asma Mehan is the current Postdoc fellow affiliated both at the Leiden Institute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology (CADS) and the Leiden-Delft-Erasmus (LDE) program for Port City Futures (PCF).

Maurice Jansen
Maurice Jansen

Maurice Jansen, MSc. is a senior researcher and business developer at Erasmus UPT. As a business expert, he specializes in Strategic Management and Environment. He studied business administration at RSM, Erasmus University in Rotterdam. Before moving to maritime education, he worked at a global freight forwarder as a supply chain solutions developer. Maurice puts the human factor and human capital at the centre of port-city development. He is highly interested in the ‘tensions’ in port cities. Where the port and the city meet there is dynamism, conflicts arise, but there is also room for creativity.

Amanda Brandellero
Amanda Brandellero

Amanda Brandellero is Associate Professor at the Department of Arts and Culture Studies, at the Erasmus School of History, Culture and Communication. She gained her PhD from the University of Amsterdam in 2010. She teaches courses on sustainability and creativity in urban development.